Want to buy a new PC? I can help.

Discussion in 'General' started by TheKingJenson, Jan 8, 2018.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. TheKingJenson

    TheKingJenson Overlord

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,762
    Likes Received:
    813
    Ratings:
    +2,136
    Title.

    If you're in the market for a new PC or even just want to see what you could get for some specific amount of money, I can help you find something that fits your needs.

    If you want a part list made, include:

    • Region (US, UK, Germany, Australia, etc)
    • Budget range
    • Build yourself, Pre-built, laptop, etc
    • What you want to do with it (which games, video/photo editing, artwork, AutoCAD, overclocking, etc)
    • Do you want any particular color scheme? (This would likely add a small amount to the total if the color scheme is basically anything except black+red, so keep that in mind)
    • Should I include a copy of Windows in the total budget? (it's basically $100 for a copy if you wanna subtract that from your own budget that you give me, also keep in mind you can run Windows 10 trial forever and not buy a copy)
    • Anything else you want added on? (specific monitor, keyboard, mouse, etc)
    Region:
    Budget:
    Parts, Prebuilt, or Laptop:
    Purpose/What you'll use it for:
    Preferred color scheme, if any:
    Should I include Windows 10 in total price:
    Anything else (monitor, keyboard, mouse, comments, etc):

    Like I said, I'm fine making a list for you if you just wanna see what you could get for the money, even if you don't plan on buying anything.

    These builds are designed to be used as a generic template to start from if you want to make your own part lists. They use parametric filters for a few parts to show the lowest possible price for those parts, but they're meant to be more of a placeholder so you can choose whatever part you like to fit your interests.

    Keep in mind that the prices of parts change literally everyday depending on supply and demand, discounts, and rebate deals, so these part lists will often dip above or below their respective price goals. I'll try to keep them updated, but assume that most of these will be at least $10 above or below their intended price point.

    LAST UPDATE: May 12th, 2018
    Minimum Cost
    AMD | Intel

    $400 Base
    AMD | Intel

    $500 Base
    AMD | Intel

    $600 Base
    AMD | Intel

    $700 Base
    AMD | Intel

    $800 Base
    AMD | Intel

    $900 Base
    AMD | Intel

    $1000 Base
    AMD | Intel

    $1100 Base
    AMD | Intel

    $1200 Base
    AMD | Intel

    $1300 Base
    AMD | Intel


    Edit 1: Can't do custom waterloops, sorry. Not very easy to put together on PCPP and there are better people out there than me to teach you about them.

    Edit 2: Changed the "template" just a bit to help gather more relevant information

    Edit 3: Base-level part lists added

    10 April 2018: Reference lists for both AMD and Intel, added response template

    11 April 2018: Tweaked response template for clarity, put edits into this collapsed changelog =P

    12 May 2018: modified base part lists to target gaming - focus on buying best GPU possible rather than high-end CPU
     
    #1 TheKingJenson, Jan 8, 2018
    Last edited: May 12, 2018
    • Like Like x 10
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Zack

    Zack Overlord

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2016
    Messages:
    1,988
    Likes Received:
    1,272
    Ratings:
    +2,509
    KnightZack
    Budget: $500-700 USD
    Build yourself
    It'll be used for gaming, as well as video/sound editing. My current PC is so bad that it lags while running League, which seems insane.
    My only preference is that it works, not necessarily picky.
    No need, I can get myself a copy of windows and I'll probably end up dual booting anyway.

    I've seen your responses to peoples pc questions in the past, and I was actually about to send you a note asking for some help on a build. I can throw together a decent build on my own, but I trust your knowledge on this sort of thing far above myself.
     
  3. AfterHell

    AfterHell Trailblazer

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2017
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    107
    Ratings:
    +154
    Cool thread, do you study a career in computer maintenence, and or putting together pc's? I run auto cad quite a bit, and some linux, looking for a nice budget computer that would do the job.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Pedrex

    Pedrex Nobility

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2015
    Messages:
    1,484
    Likes Received:
    317
    Ratings:
    +664
    Just a little comment, but the graphics cards just went up.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. AfterHell

    AfterHell Trailblazer

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2017
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    107
    Ratings:
    +154
    Yeah i took notice, especially the 1080's
     
    #5 AfterHell, Jan 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
    • Like Like x 1
  6. TheKingJenson

    TheKingJenson Overlord

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,762
    Likes Received:
    813
    Ratings:
    +2,136
    https://pcpartpicker.com/list/yxXvwV

    EDIT: switched the list to a cheaper 1050 Ti because I fücked up and sorted search results wrong. It's now just $10 over budget rather than $40, so keep that in mind while going through the below text.

    This one's actually over your budget by $40, and it's because of this:
    Some bullish!t. Blame crypto miners. The 1050 Ti really ought to be $155 and not $195, but hell, what can we do. So, you're looking at $740 for that.
    The Ryzen 5 1500X seems like a solid pick for a processor at around $165, Intel doesn't have much to compete in that price segment when we're already over budget. A comparable pick price-wise would be the i3-8350K, but it's a bit more expensive, plus the 1500X comes with its own cooler and has 6 cores/12 threads, which would definitely help with any video or audio editing you do, provided the programs take advantage of multiple cores. The 8350K really outperforms the 1500X in single-core applications (as is always the case with Intel vs AMD) but it only has 4 cores and no hyperthreading, so the 6c/12t vs 4c/4t really factored into my decision on that one.

    Ryzen processors tend to run better with higher clocked RAM with diminishing returns after about 3000mhz. I went with 8GB of 3000mhz, swapping down to like 2400mhz would only save $5 or so. And don't you dare only buy 4GB of RAM.

    One thing you could do to tighten up the budget is take out the SSD. It's the easiest thing in the build to sacrifice/downgrade, but it's up to you whether to keep it or not. Objectively speaking, the biggest real-world speed upgrade you can make to a PC is using an SSD instead of an HDD, which is why I really wanted to include one. The faster boot, download, copy, etc times on everything are really nice to have, but if you're strict on the budget, it's probably the first thing I'd remove. Can always upgrade later when the money's there. The other cost-saver could be to downgrade the GPU, especially with the recent price jump, but you may or may not be happy with less than 4GB of VRAM, plus the other performance reductions that would come with downgrading. That one's totally up to you.

    Nothing much to say about the mobo, case, or PSU. They get the job done and upgrading those won't give you much of a day-to-day advantage over what I picked. EDIT: I did specifically pick out a modular PSU, which basically means you only connect the cables that you need and don't have a bunch of cables taking up space that you aren't even using. Semi-modular is another option but I don't think it would save much money, if any at all.

    Think that's about it with that build, I can always go back and adjust things, but for now, let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

    I'm in the middle of a computer science degree, specializing in cybersecurity, but I also do a fair share of programming, and I did just a little bit of computer engineering but never got into it. I've built maybe a dozen PC's but never did it as an official job or made a business of it or anything. Just enjoy doing it ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    And yeah, AutoCAD was a lot of fun to learn and use (my dad runs a civil engineering company), but man does that thing eat resources. Building budget PCs around it is tough, but it can be done I guess, fun challenge!
     
    #6 TheKingJenson, Jan 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
    • Like Like x 2
  7. OhLights

    OhLights Nobility

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2017
    Messages:
    914
    Likes Received:
    214
    Ratings:
    +656
    roadwork
    I got my 1050 Ti for 115$. They spiked after that.:)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. TheKingJenson

    TheKingJenson Overlord

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,762
    Likes Received:
    813
    Ratings:
    +2,136
    PC builders around the world hate you for that :)
     
  9. Zack

    Zack Overlord

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2016
    Messages:
    1,988
    Likes Received:
    1,272
    Ratings:
    +2,509
    KnightZack
    Bless you, taking a look at it now and this is a really nice build. One question though, you mention how you picked out a modular PSU, but on the build it says semi- modular? It wouldn't surprise me if I'm reading the build wrong (I'm not that knowledgeable with computers), but that part confused me. The rest looks great though, thank you so much dude.
     
  10. TheKingJenson

    TheKingJenson Overlord

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,762
    Likes Received:
    813
    Ratings:
    +2,136
    Hah! I knew I'd messed up on something. Yeah, it is just a semi-modular, not full-modular. Good catch. If you don't know the differences, this sums it up pretty succinctly:
    https://support.nzxt.com/hc/en-us/a...emi-Vs-Non-Modular-What-Are-The-Differences-?
     
  11. Zack

    Zack Overlord

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2016
    Messages:
    1,988
    Likes Received:
    1,272
    Ratings:
    +2,509
    KnightZack
    Ah thank you. Modular in my opinion looks like a better option for me so I'm going to take a peak around and see what I can find for around the same price range as the semi-modular. I doubt there's a massive difference between the two, but I'd rather have the ability to reduce cable clutter.
     
  12. TheKingJenson

    TheKingJenson Overlord

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,762
    Likes Received:
    813
    Ratings:
    +2,136
    https://pcpartpicker.com/list/MK4djc

    New list with a comparable fully-modular PSU. It's actually a couple dollars cheaper than the original one, which probably comes down to the efficiency certifications. 80+ bronze as opposed to 80+ gold really isn't a deal-breaker, as it's really just a measurement of how much energy is wasted by the PSU. It doesn't affect PC performance at all, and realistically having a bronze certification instead of gold only makes a couple dollars difference in electricity costs per YEAR. It's no sweat.

    (oh, and it's also 30W less of peak power, but it's still at least two or three times more than what you'll need to power that PC, so don't worry about that)
     
  13. Zack

    Zack Overlord

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2016
    Messages:
    1,988
    Likes Received:
    1,272
    Ratings:
    +2,509
    KnightZack
    Oh my lord, I was just looking at this one haha. Thanks, now I'm only $7 over budget :D
     
  14. AfterHell

    AfterHell Trailblazer

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2017
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    107
    Ratings:
    +154
    Ooh cyber security! Exactly what i am persuing when i graduate! Pretty neat that you are going after cyber security. It's a great career. Any suggestions on computers that would be great for cyber security?
     
  15. Adoze

    Adoze Explorer

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2017
    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    51
    Ratings:
    +199
    I’m a pc nerd too... If anyone needs help troubleshooting a pc or building or anything pc related lol hmu I’ll help :D
     
  16. TheKingJenson

    TheKingJenson Overlord

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,762
    Likes Received:
    813
    Ratings:
    +2,136
    For me, the whole process has involved lots of running virtual machines and keeping up with cutting-edge technology, so while I don't have any specific recommendations, I'd definitely say that having the best processor and as much RAM as you can afford is a given. SSD is also a huge help with running everything. Depending on what you're doing and how much of your work/studying is done in class, it might be a good idea to pick up a high-end laptop rather than a desktop PC. Of course, you get all the drawbacks of buying a laptop, but if the mobility is a must-have, it's pretty much your only option. Graphics aren't much of a specific priority, especially if you get a laptop, but just having a GPU can be helpful for some tasks, even if it's not gaming-related. Not always easy to check all the boxes, but for example, here's a laptop with a 7th-generation i7, a 256GB SSD with 1TB secondary hard drive, 16GB of RAM, and a GTX 1060 for $1400usd:
    https://www.newegg.com/products/N82E16834233226
    And here's another one, same specs but with a GTX 1050 Ti, for just $1100:
    https://www.newegg.com/products/9SIAEYJ6PT0370

    Not gonna say I recommend these laptops in particular since I haven't looked into them at all, but on the surface that's a damn fine price for all of that in a laptop.
     
  17. Cansky

    Cansky Administrator
    Staff Member Administrator Content Team

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2015
    Messages:
    1,029
    Likes Received:
    694
    Ratings:
    +948
    Cansky
    Don't know about you guys but I'm going with my 4.5ghz i7 3770K till the death.. :p
     
  18. TheKingJenson

    TheKingJenson Overlord

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1,762
    Likes Received:
    813
    Ratings:
    +2,136
    Honestly, at this point I wouldn't be too surprised if your 3770K actually DID die before you need to upgrade it. Every year new benchmarks come out comparing it to the new flagship i7 and it's always "Nope don't upgrade, maybe next year". Thing's unkillable.
     
  19. Cansky

    Cansky Administrator
    Staff Member Administrator Content Team

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2015
    Messages:
    1,029
    Likes Received:
    694
    Ratings:
    +948
    Cansky
    It really is unkillable, I mean I hurt it more than I am now because of putting manual turbo boost that made it to 4.2ghz, but with voltages going up to 1.4v. Now it's at a stable 1.32V with 45 multiplier (old one also had 103bus and made my ram slightly overclocked for more than a year)
    --- Double Post Merged, Jan 8, 2018, Original Post Date: Jan 8, 2018 ---
    Being at top 2% of i7 3770K benchmarks makes me want to push my cpu more- but that's for another time that I actually decide on upgrading :)
    --- Double Post Merged, Jan 8, 2018 ---
    I mean, not only is it unkillable it's still performing well for a platform that was made over 5 years ago. Plus ddr3 ram prices aren't going up anytime soon ;)
     
    • Salty Salty x 1
  20. Ella

    Ella Citizen

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2015
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    19
    Ratings:
    +47
    Looking for a good prebuilt
    Budget: $800
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.